Globicate

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Kids Say the Darnedest Things Part 4


The other day we were doing “popcorn” reading where the students take turns reading a paragraph out loud. After their paragraph is over they get to call on another student to read the next paragraph by saying, “popcorn” and then the next reader’s name. Some of my kiddos have been getting silly with “popcorning” other students by saying, “popcorn with extra butter” or “popcorn with extra corn” before calling the next reader. Well, one of my students was in the middle of saying “popcorn with extra butter” when another student did something that distracted him, so he stopped in the middle of his sentence. Instead of what he meant to say, we all heard, “popcorn with extra butt...”

Of course we all burst out in uncontainable laughter and the room filled with “ews” and “gross.” Needless to say, it took a minute or two to redirect the students, but I eventually got them back on track.


The Resourceful Teacher Blog

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Daily G.L.O.W.

Daily G.L.O.W., flags, Uruguay, geography, resources, classroom, Globicate

Daily G.L.O.W., flags, Uruguay, geography, resources, classroom, Globicate




Today's Daily G.L.O.W. hails from a country founded by the Portuguese in 1680. Above you'll see their flag and a coat of arms.

Do you know what a coat of arms is?  Why are there coat of arms?

What similarities and differences do you see between the flag and the coat of arms?

What might the symbols on each represent?

Why did they use the colors that they did?

This country only has one border with another country, what might be on it's other borders?

Does that give you a hint as to the type of climate and geography that surrounds it?

This country is the second smallest nation on the continent it is on.  Any ideas yet? 

Make sure you use the Daily G.L.O.W. or G.L.O.W. worksheet to organize your thoughts, and good luck!


Monday, May 28, 2012

Division Flip Books

Here are the Division Flip Books my students created to help them with division.  When teaching division and long division with my students, I teach them to memorize the steps: Divide, Multiply, Subtract, then Bring down (or up).  Making these flip books allows students to see each of the steps on individual pages.

Here is a Division Flip Book I created to show simple division.








This Division Flip Book shows long division.

(I didn't include every page of the flip book)






To view more ideas by The Resourceful Teacher, click the button below!

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Sunday, May 27, 2012

Technical Difficulties

Corrupted File, downloading hints, technical difficulties, Globicate, Heidi Befort


I'm sure you've already figured out there are a lot of teacher/bloggers/entrepreneurs out there.  The great thing about this is we all have something special and unique to say in a lot of different ways.  The other great part is that many of share free and paid items either through our blog, our TeachersPayTeachers store, Teachers Notebook, Pinterest, or Learnist.  These are all great places to find information, freebies, and loads of stuff you can use in your classroom everyday.  One of the biggest questions and concerns we get asked all of the time is, "How do I open this file" or "I can't open this file, help!" Well, just in time to save you from summer frustration as you download lots of freebies over the summer, Erica Bohrer's First Grade, has written a great post about how to do this without all of the frustration, and if it doesn't work what steps to take.  So, next time you get the dreaded "corrupted file" message, check out this blog for some help! Happy Resource Hunting this summer!


Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Teacher Gift from Around the Globe

Did you grab your Teacher Gift From Around the Globe? 

Global Teacher Connect assembled a group of teachers (including myself) contribued a worksheet or activity and compiled it together to create a FREE downloadable E-Book.  If you haven't downloaded yours yet, it's not too late.  Simply click the icon below and it's yours!

Global Giveaway E-Book Free Teacher Resources

To view more blogs by The Resourceful Teacher, click the button below.



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Sunday, May 20, 2012

Spaced Out!

Yesterday, I shared with you my End of Year Student "Uniqueness" Ceremony.  This is just one way that I end the year with my students.  Another way that we share in each others multiple intelligences, is by doing a project-based learning unit at the end of the year.  This project has a two-fold target; first, to get the students actively involved for the last couple of weeks on a thematic unit that focuses on many areas such as, reading, writing, research, synthesizing, analyzing, applying, math, science, and social studies. This way they can "show what you know".  The second part is having the students present their projects, and then we get to giggle and enjoy each others presentations. The unit I created this year was called, "Spaced Out" and it focused on the solar system and its components.  Below is an example of the unit and its rubric which you can grab for free from my Google Docs, and also there is an example of one of the technology components.  The students created an "Interplanetary Law Enforcement Team", and then created a Voki to share the rules with the Solar System.  They are very cute and the students enjoyed working on them tremendously.  This is just another way to make your last couple of weeks, enjoyable, meaningful for both you and the students, and educational!

Space, thematic unit, end of year activities, reading, writing, technology, Globicate, Heidi Befort


Here are some examples of the students projects, flags, Voki's, and maps. As you can see there is a variety of examples and ways the students chose to present their projects.  That's the fun of doing a unit like this at the end of the year!

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort

Solar System, student work, thematic units, Globicate, Heidi Befort





And The Winner Is...



The end of the year is always bittersweet to me. On one hand I'm excited for the year to end because I'm looking forward to sleep, renewal, and some down time to relax.  On the other hand I'm sad to see my students leave, many who I've I had for multiple years since I teach a multiage class.  I've also moved from two different grade levels, so this group I've had a total of three years.  Last years group I had a total of 4 years.  The last week of school is filled with memorable activities including a ceremony of goodbyes, which is essential in a multiage class because it's like losing one of your family, or in my case a lot of your family.  I've spent countless hours with these kids, and know many of them as well as their parents do.  So with that in mind, I love to identify each one with a special certificate that notices their unique qualities. Many years ago, I created certificates for each student recognizing something funny or special about them.  I hold a ceremony where I sit in front of the class in my rocking chair, they sit on the floor around me.  Next, I bring each student up individually and the class guesses what their special "thing" might be, then I give them a certificate identifying one unique quality.  This is a wonderful activity to do with your students at the end of the year because they appreciate that you noticed them.  It also creates a bond between all of them, and gives them something to treasure for years to come.  So, as I approach the end of this school year, and reminisce with my students over the next 4 days, I will treasure each special quality and uniqueness that my students have given me.  If you're interested in purchasing this set of 20 for $2.00 you can go to my TpT store.  Look for my next post for another end of the year activity!


End of school year, certificate, unique qualities, Globicate, Heidi Befort

End of school year, certificate, unique qualities, Globicate, Heidi Befort


 


Saturday, May 19, 2012

Using Resources - Encyclopedia & Atlas

This week in English, my students learned how to use references to locate specific information. Today, our Friday Fun Day activity involved the use of Encyclopedias and Atlases.  The students worked in groups to research a state. Each group researched a different state from the United States of their choosing.  Their research packet included specific questions about the state, and students were required to use the encyclopedia and atlas to answer the questions.

Once they answered the questions, they created a poster which includes some of the facts they researched.  At the end of the day, students presented their poster and research information to the class.

Here are some pictures of the worksheet they fillled out.  You can download this worksheet here.


Here are the kids working on their posters.




   
   






These are the finished posters.









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Saturday, May 12, 2012

Eliminating "Can't" From Students' Vocabulary



All too often teachers hear the phrase muttered (sometimes even exclaimed) from a frustrated student, “I can’t do this!”

As a teacher, I really dislike when students say they can’t do something.  This often leads to student-shut down (or sometimes melt-downs), depending on the situation. I always like to invoke a spirit of positivity with myself and my students.  Here’s how I do it:
At the beginning of every school year I have a discussion with my students about the word “can’t.”  I lead the students to begin discussing and pondering the negative effects of telling yourself that you can’t do something.  We also discuss when it’s appropriate to use the word; for example, if a student tells another student he can’t have a playdate.  
After this guided discussion, I give each student a piece of paper and direct them to write the word “can’t” very big on the paper.  Then I instruct the students to crumple up the piece of paper and throw it in the trash because we are eliminating this word from our vocabulary.

After that point, whenever a student attempts telling me that they can’t do something, I stop them right away and tell them that I don’t understand what they’re saying because we threw out the word “can’t.” I then direct them to a different way of communicating their frustration such as, “I’m having a hard time with this, will you help me?”

Does anyone have any other tricks likes this to share?
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